40: Awesome Delegation Part 2

Friday, August 29th, 2014 in Podcast Episodes with 0 Comments

Delegation  may not come naturally to us, but it is a skill we can learn

Delegation may not come naturally to us, but it is a skill we can learn

This is part 2 of this topic. This is such an important topic that I just had to stretch it into 2 episodes so I could make sure I really cover it well.

Delegation is really an issue of respect, and how much we respect those that are “under” us on our team. With responsibility comes the authority to do a job. If you respect people, you will give them authority with responsibility. Even if you have difficulty respecting the people you work with, you can still set a good example for them by being respectful, and allowing their responses that do not come from a place of respect show their true colors.

 

My rule on delegation

When a person is delegated a job to do, they should be allowed to choose how the job is done as much as possible. There are exceptions to this like with fire fighters and medical personnel that must follow procedures.

It is okay to check on their work, but we should not be looking over the shoulder of the one delegated work to make sure they are doing it the way we would, or employing the same strategy we would. The important thing in good delegation is that the job gets done.

 

5 Key Ingredients for Clean Delegation

  1. Have faith in the one to whom you delegate: learn to trust and respect, hire people that you do respect and that you feel confident in delegating to.
  2. Release the desire to do it better yourself.
  3. Relax from the obsession that it has to be done your way.
  4. Practice patience in the desire to do it faster yourself.
  5. Have a vision to develop other people under your supervision by learning how to delegate really well.

 

Guidelines for Clean Delegation

  1. Choose qualified people-if you have people on your team that are not qualified then you need to develop the courage to make changes and get the wrong people “off the buss” and the right people on.
  2. Exhibit confidence in their work, this will grow with time.
  3. Make their duties clear.
  4. Delegate the proper authority with the responsibility.
  5. Do not tell them how to actually do the work.
  6. Set up accountability points along the way.
  7. Supervise according to their follow through style.
  8. Give them room to fail occasionally.
  9. Give praise and credit for work well done.

 

The story of Sam and how NOT to delegate

I once worked with a guy I will call Sam. he was given a big project by our boss, with a long lead time and little details. Sam being new and a good worker wanted to really impress. So he launched into the project doing tons of research, going over possibilities, and in the end delivering a 50 page report to the boss. After a few days of not hearing anything he caught up with the boss in the hallway and asked him what he thought of the proposal. The boss just said: “we decided to go in another direction.”

Can you believe that? How would you feel in that situation? Sam was devastated and he was angry, as he should be. Let’s look at what the boss did wrong that really hurt Sam and disrespected him as a worker:

  1.  The longer we lead, the less we remember what it is like to be a follower. We need to keep the thoughts and feelings of those we lead in mind.
  2. He failed to really give the work to Sam, to truly delegate it. If he had done this, he would not have made a decision without Sam as part of the equation. Assignments need to be given with the authority and the freedom to complete the task.
  3. Failure to stay in touch. Without check in points along the way of the project, there was no way for the boss to know that Sam was going all out on this project and moving it in a direction that the boss did not want it to go.
  4. Short-circuited decision making process: Sam was never considered part of the decision making process, the boss just wanted his opinion. The boss should have been clear on how the decision was going to be made and how much Sam should put in to the project. The boss seems to have just wanted a casual opinion, which would have taken a lot less time to prepare.
  5. The boss was playing the “inner circle game.” Oftentimes managers have a small circle of people that they trust and make all of their decisions with, rather than including a greater part of the organization, especially when they ask someone outside the inner circle (like Sam) for input or rather just information. This alienates the rest of the organization and does not allow them to share in responsibility and decision making.

After that Sam crawled into his own shell of self-preservation, and never regained respect for that manager. He also told me: “I will never volunteer to do a project for him again.”

 

Follow Through Styles

Since no two people are exactly the same, no two people work the same way and therefore different people have different types of flow through style and require different types of supervision. In their book Management of Organizational Behavior Hersey, Blanchard, and Johnson develop a Delegation Continuum:

Screenshot 2014-08-26 11.13.28

Four Stages of Delegation

  1. Assignment
  2. Authority
  3. Hold them accountable
  4. Feedback/affirmation (depending on how good a job they do).

 

Four Questions Every Follower Asks

  1. What am I supposed to do?
  2. Will you let me do it?
  3. Will you help me when I need it?
  4. Will you let me know how I am doing?

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39: How to Be An Awesome Delegator – Part 1

Friday, August 15th, 2014 in Podcast Episodes with 0 Comments

Are you a great delegator, or do you tend to run the whole race yourself?

Are you a great delegator, or do you tend to run the whole race yourself?

This podcast is based on my book “Top Ten Mistakes Leaders Make,” specifically Chapter 6: Dirty Delegation, Refusing to Relax and Let Go.”

The important concepts to take from this chapter:

  • Overmanaging is one of the great cardinal sins of poor leadership.
  • Nothing frustrates those who work for you more than sloppy delegation with too many strings attached.
  • Delegation should match each worker’s follow-through ability.

Read More…

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38: Paperwork versus Peoplework

Friday, August 1st, 2014 in Podcast Episodes with 0 Comments

As leaders we need to grow to embrace people over paper

As leaders we need to grow to embrace people over paper

Are you “people oriented” or “task oriented”? This week I am going to address this topic as it appears in my book “The Top Ten Mistakes Leaders Make.”

We all fight the battle of paperwork, especially today with all the different ways that people can reachus via phone, text, E-mail, instant message, and more, and all right on our smart phones that are with us wherever we go. The problem is that leadership is about “people work”which I am going to address from Chapter 2 of my book. Read More…

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37: Building Consensus From the Inside Out

Friday, July 18th, 2014 in Podcast Episodes with 0 Comments

Arms of business partners keeping their hands on top of each oth

To create change you must first get your most important people on board, then move out from there.

This is the second in a series on how to lead change effectively. If you have not listened to the first in this series that is okay because these episodes stand on their own as individual lessons that build on the theme of orchestrating change.

Without Consensus, change is Dead on Arrival

Read More…

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36: Women in Leadership: Kathrine Lee Interview Part 2

Thursday, July 3rd, 2014 in Podcast Episodes with 0 Comments

This week is part 2 of my interview with Kathrine Lee

This week is part 2 of my interview with Kathrine Lee

A Guest Blog with Kathrine Lee, The Ultimate Source

Women in leadership. I am asked about this topic quite a bit. I am not writing this from a political perspective, a position of hierarchy, and certainly not from a religious one. I am simply responding from my experience, my respect for men and love of women.

To discuss this topic, we first have to ask a question, “What is a leader?” The definition includes words & phrases like: a person who guides or directs a group; authoritativeness, influence, command, effectiveness; sway, clout; one who goes before or with to show the way; to guide in direction, course, action or opinion. Read More…

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